Translation of Evangeline Acadian Queen

December 3, 2016

Angèle Arsenault wrote this back in 1977, and I haven’t been able to find a translation that I really liked. So I had to do it myself. It’s from her album Libre (SPPS Disques, PS-19903) and was my first introduction to Acadia.

I’m going to talk to you of someone that you know
Yes but don’t deceive yourself, she did not come from the States
Even if a certain fellow who was called Longfellow
Popularized her two hundred years ago
She was called Évangéline, she was very very fine
She loved Gabriel on earth as if in heaven
They lived in Acadia, they were damned rich1
But one day the English were no longer satisfied
So they deported them, Gabriel disappeared
Discouraged2 Évangéline searched for him as long as she could
She searched for him in Acadia in Quebec in Ontario
Then in the United States in Florida in Idaho
Arriving in Louisiana with her cousin Diane
She said I have lost my time3
She was 75 years old4
Working a the hospital, she cared for the sick
Then she saw her Gabriel who was leaving for heaven
She jumped on his neck
And said thank you very much
At the hour that you’re interred I will be able to return
I’m going to invest in the companies of the future
So that the name of Évangéline will be bloody well known5

Évangéline Fried Clams
Évangéline Salon Bar
Évangéline Sexy Ladies Wear
Évangéline Comfortable Running Shoes
Évangéline Automobile Springs
Évangéline Regional High School
Évangéline Savings Mortgage and Loans
Évangéline The only French Newspaper in New Brunswick
Évangéline Acadian Queen

  1. This is “riches en maudit” in the original.
  2. This is “déconfortée”in the original.
  3. This proves that Angèle didn’t come from Clare, since she wrote “soixante et quinze” instead of “septante-cinq.”
  4. This is “A dit là j’perdrai pu mon temps.” It seems to indicate both past and future.
  5. This was the hardest to translate, “soit connu en câline.” Literally, “will be known in cuddly” but câline is a milder form of the sacre (expletive) câlisse or chalice.

Creating headers in LibreOffice

February 20, 2013

Recently I had to create headers in LibreOffice. It’s not hard, but neither is it obvious. Here’s how I did it:

  1. Insert->Header->Default
  2. Format->Page->Header and unclick “Same page left/right”
  3. Edit the header to have all the text you want (sans fields)
  4. Insert the fields in the right places. I wanted Chapter and Page Number, so I did Insert->Fields->Page Number and Insert->Fields->Other->Chapter. I used tab to space them out. (In general, page number goes on the left for even pages and on the right for odd pages.)
  5. That was cool and all, but left me with a page number on page one, which I didn’t want. Luckily, I found this site which explained the magic. Go to the first page, then click Format->Styles and Formatting. Pick the fourth box (Page Styles) and double-click on “First Page”.

Done! Now I have headers that look like books or magazines.