Setting up Direwolf/Xastir on a Raspberry Pi

March 22, 2015

A long time ago I set up Soundmodem for Ubuntu. Recently, I tried setting up an igate using WB2OSZ’s Direwolf instead. Things are much nicer these days.

The Direwolf site includes a very nice guide to setting up a Raspberry Pi as an igate, so I won’t go over it here. Instead, this is just to record the steps I took to set up my Raspberry Pi v2 as an igate server.

1. Set up the Raspberry Pi to run Raspbian
2. Follow along with the setup guide:

sudo apt-get remove --purge pulseaudio # I didn't need to do this since it wasn't installed, but better safe than sorry
sudo apt-get install libasound2-dev xastir # Note that I'm installing xastir at the same time - this is different from the direwolf guide
cd ~
git clone https://www.github.com/wb2osz/direwolf
cd direwolf
git checkout 1.2
make
sudo make install
make install-rpi
make install-conf

Next, make sure the sound card is plugged into USB (I used the bottom slot). When I plugged it in, the system rebooted, so it’s probably smart to shut down before plugging the sound card in. For a sound card, I used the Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset from Amazon.

From there, run
aplay -l
to see:
card 1: Device [C-Media USB Audio Device], device 0: USB Audio [USB Audio]

Now I know the device is card 1 device 0. We’re almost ready to edit direwolf.conf. First, though – something that wasn’t documented on the Direwolf site. Igates need a secret code so they can log into the tier 2 servers. It’s based on your callsign, and there’s a utility called callpass in Xastir that will compute it for you.

callpass {my-real-call}

This gives you a 5 or 6 digit integer that you should remember. I’ll call it {my-code}.

Now edit direwolf.conf:

  1. uncomment ADEVICE plughw:1,0 – if you got a different number from aplay above, you might have to modify it.
  2. change MYCALL NOCALL to MYCALL {my-real-call}-10. I used -10 because that’s the APRS SSID for igates. (APRS SSIDs are documented here.) In the direwolf.conf that I got, the NOCALL had a ^J after it; I had to take that out
  3. uncomment IGSERVER noam.aprs2.net (maybe use a different server if you’re not in North America)
  4. uncomment IGLOGIN and change it to IGLOGIN {my-real-call} {my code}
  5. direwolf

Yay, you’re igating. But what’s around? Set up Xastir for that:

  1. xastir
  2. In the first menu that comes up, set your callsign to {my-real-call}-10 and (if desired) set your lat/long/position ambiguity
  3. Interface -> Interface Control, Add, Networked AGWPE, Add. Leave Pass-code blank, save and Start. Now you’re getting APRS from over the air displayed on your Xastir maps.
  4. Not enough for you? Interface -> Interface Control, Add, Internet Server, Add. Set Pass-code to {my-code}, save and Start. Now you’re getting APRS from the network as well.
  5. Want to see it on maps? I wasn’t able to get all the maps going, but things worked when I picked Maps -> Map Chooser and selected only Online/osm_tiled_mapnik.geo and worldhi.map.

Adding ATtiny support to Arduino IDE 1.6.1

March 22, 2015

I recently upgrade from the 1.0.5 version of the Arduino IDE to 1.6.1. Things aren’t completely smooth – in particular, I was using Coding Badly’s cores for ATtiny85, ATtiny84 and ATtiny2313.

Unfortunately, those haven’t yet been updated for the new layout specified in the 1.6.x IDE. So instead I switched for now at least to the damellis cores (which support ATtiny85 and ATtiny84, but not ATtiny2313/4313).

Installing this is a matter of unzipping it in the sketchbook/hardware folder (on my Windows box in C:\Users\{my user}\Documents\Arduino).

In Windows cmd shell:
cd "C:\Users\{my user}\Documents\Arduino"
mkdir hardware
unzip c:\{whatever}\attiny-ide-1.6.x.zip
cd hardware
move ..\attiny-ide-1.6.x\attiny .
cd ..
rmdir attiny-ide-1.6.x

At some point in the future either the Coding Badly cores will support IDE 1.6 (hopefully with the nice variants structure that the damellis cores use) or the damellis cores will do ATtinyX313s.